Adult Immunisation; 10 Must Have Vaccines For Adults

on Sunday, 18 December 2011. Posted in Know Your Vaccines, Immunization Written By: superadmin

Some vaccines adults need to have from time to time

Adult Immunisation; 10 Must Have Vaccines For Adults

The process of immunization is an ongoing one and does not just end with your vaccination during childhood. There are several adult vaccines available. Read on to know more about them, the diseases they prevent and who needs to get them.

The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccinations from birth through adulthood to provide a lifetime of immunity; and you thought vaccines were just for kids! Not getting vaccinated at the right age may leave you very vulnerable to illness, suffering and even death.

Here's a list of vaccinations recommended specifically for adults:

DTap (Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular pertussis) Vaccine

DTap or Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus and diphtheria as well as pertussis.

Who needs it?

  • All adults in the age group of 19-64, who have never received a TDaP vaccine. (Irrespective of when the last vaccine containing tetanus or Diphtheria toxoid was given)
  • Adults with a wound that is likely to get infected.
  • Mothers who have just given birth and haven't had a Tdap vaccine.
  • Women planning to have a baby.
  • Adults having close contact with infants younger than 12 months ((e.g. childcare providers, healthcare providers, grandparents under the age of 65) who have not had a TDaP vaccine.

Since immunity to diphtheria and tetanus wanes with time, boosters of Tdap are required every 10 years for adults.

Who should avoid it?

  • Any person who has had a serious allergic reaction to a vaccine component or a prior dose of the vaccine.
  • Pregnant women
  • People with a history of encephalopathy within 7 days of receiving a DTP or DTaP vaccine.
  • If one is currently ill.

Seasonal influenza (flu)

Influenza, also called the flu, is a contagious viral infection of the nose, throat and lungs that can cause mild to severe illness. There are two types of flu vaccines available, the injection (with killed virus) and nasal spray vaccines (containing live, but weakened, virus).

Who needs it?

All adults need a dose every fall (or winter) for their protection and for the protection of others around them.

Who should avoid it?

  • People allergic to eggs;
  • People who have ever had a severe allergic reaction to influenza vaccine;
  • People with a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome

Chickenpox

Chicken pox can create more severe complications for adults as compared to that in children. In adults chicken pox could lead to life-threatening Pneumonia, brain inflammation and shingles.

Who needs it?

All adults who have never had the vaccine and have never had the chicken pox disease; especially women who are planning to have a baby in the near future. This vaccine is given in two separate doses.

Who should avoid it?

  • People with weak immune systems
  • People who have ever had a severe allergic reaction to gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin
  • Pregnant women or if you think you could be pregnant within the next 4 weeks of taking this vaccine
  • If one is currently ill.

Pneumonia

The bacterium Pneumococcus causes several different types of serious infections, the most common of which is pneumonia. Pneumococcal infections spread by coughing and sneezing.

Who needs it?

  • Adults 65 years of age and older
  • People with chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and AIDS
  • People without a spleen
  • People undergoing Chemotherapy
  • People living in high-risk environments
  • People who smoke

Who should avoid it?

  • People who have ever had a severe allergic reaction to gelatin, previous pneumonia vaccine
  • If one is currently ill.

Meningitis

Meningitis is an infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord.

Who needs it?

  • people who have had their spleen removed
  • people with complement deficiency
  • if one is travelling to areas where meningococcal disease is present
  • military recruits
  • lab workers who might be exposed to the bacteria
  • people living in dorms

Who should avoid it?

  • People with a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • If one is currently ill.

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)

Who needs it?

  • people born during or after 1957 who have not had measles, mumps or
  • rubella or the MMR vaccine
  • people entering college
  • healthcare workers
  • international travelers

Who should avoid it?

  • People with weak immune systems.
  • People who have ever had a severe allergic reaction to gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin.
  • Pregnant women or if you think you could be pregnant within 4 weeks of taking this vaccine.
  • If one is currently ill.
  • If one recently got a blood transfusion done.
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis A. is a virus that infects the liver.
  • Who needs it?
  • people who want to be protected against hepatitis A virus
  • people traveling to countries with moderate or high rates of hepatitis A
  • men who have sex with men
  • people who share needles using injection drugs
  • people who have chronic liver disease or who receive clotting factor concentrates
  • laboratory workers who work with hepatitis A virus

Who should avoid it?

  • Any person who has had a serious allergic reaction to a vaccine component or a prior dose of the vaccine.
  • If one is currently ill.

Hepatitis B

This again is a virus that infects the liver.

Who needs it?

  • healthcare workers who may have contact with blood
  • sexually active people who are not in long-term, mutually monogamous relationships
  • men who have sex with men
  • people with any sexually transmitted diseases
  • people who live with or are physically intimate with a chronically infected person
  • people with chronic liver disease
  • people travelling to countries with moderate or high rates of hepatitis B
  • people receiving haemodialysis
  • people who share needles using injection drugs

Who should avoid it?

  • Any person who has had a serious allergic reaction to a vaccine component or a prior dose of the vaccine.
  • If one is currently ill.
  • If one is allergic to baker's yeast.

Herpes zoster (shingles)

Who needs it?

A single dose of this vaccine is recommended for all adults over the age of 60, irrespective of whether they have had shingles or not. The shot protects against shingles, regardless of whether the person has had the disease before or not.

Who should avoid it?

  • People who have ever had a severe allergic reaction to gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin or any other component of the shingles vaccine.
  • People on steroids, radiation or chemotherapy.
  • If one is currently ill.
  • People with weak immune systems.
  • People who have a history of bone or lymphatic cancer.

Human papilloma virus:

This is a relatively new vaccine to prevent certain types of cervical cancer.

Who needs it?

Adolescents and young adults up to 26 years of age, who have not previously received three doses of the vaccine

Who should avoid it?

  • People allergic to yeast or latex
  • People who had an allergic reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine
  • Pregnant women
  • If one is currently ill.

Infectious diseases not only have a direct impact on individuals, but also on their families and friends. Hence, it is important you consult your medical practitioner and find out what shots you are due for.

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